Fabric care

Our upholstery fabrics are free of dangerous chemicals and all fabrics are OEKO-TEX certified. Read here how to care for and maintain your furniture, whether it is wool, velour, polyester or cotton.

Care and maintenance of wool

Always start by impregnating your furniture. For this, we recommend our care products that have been developed, tested and approved for our own wool. If you impregnate your furniture later, it is important that you clean it thoroughly before using a care product for the first time. As a rule of thumb, a care product lasts about half a year, and we therefore recommend that you repeat the impregnation a couple of times a year or as needed.

It is natural for wool to form some minor wrinkles when used, as wool is a stretchy natural material. If wrinkles have formed on your wool fabric, the fabric will contract if you moisten a tea towel with demineralised water, place it on the sofa and heat the tea towel with i.e. an iron at low heat or a hair dryer. Alternatively, you can moisten a tea towel and leave it on the wrinkles overnight. When the wool fabric dries, the wool fibres will contract once again.

Care and maintenance of cotton

Always start by impregnating your furniture. For this , we recommend our care products that have been developed, tested and approved for our cotton. If you impregnate your furniture later, it is important that you clean it thoroughly before using a care product for the first time. As a rule of thumb, a care product lasts about half a year, and we therefore recommend that you repeat the impregnation a couple of times a year or as needed.

Cotton is made from natural fibres that are more sensitive to light and heat. Therefore, it's a good idea not to place the furniture in direct sunlight as it may cause fading over time. Lighter colours fade less than dark colours, so you should consider your colour selection and placement carefully. Look for the level of light fastness that indicate if the fabric can withstand more or less light. The higher the number, the better the fabric can withstand light and heat. 

Care and maintenance of polyester

Always start by impregnating your furniture. For this, we recommend our care products that have been developed, tested and approved for our polyester. If you impregnate your furniture later, it is important that you clean it thoroughly before using a care product for the first time. As a rule of thumb, a care product lasts about half a year, and we therefore recommend that you repeat the impregnation a couple of times a year or as needed.

Polyester and nylon fibres are durable and easy to maintain, and artificial fibres don't fade to the same extent as i.e. natural fibres such as cotton. Polyester fabrics therefore have a high light fastness, which ensures superior durability.

If stains occur, you can use stain cleaner from Bolia's own care product range, and if the fabric on your furniture is removable, we recommend that you place a clean tea towel between the fabric and the cushion's filling to prevent the stain from penetrating the cushion fibres and causing long-term damage.

Care and maintenance of velour

Always start by impregnating your furniture. For this, we recommend our care products that have been developed, tested and approved for our velour fabrics. Please note that due to the long pile, the impregnation may not completely penetrate the fabric and it may be necessary to repeat the treatment. Remember that your furniture should be completely dry before using it after impregnation.

Press marks may occur on the velour, where the pile has been squashed flat either during transportation or in use. This is quite normal for velour and should not be considered as a defect. To help restore the original surface, you can take a clean, neutral-coloured piece of fabric that is warm and moist and lay it on top of the velour for an hour. The moisture helps to lift the pile again. You can also use a soft brush with distilled water, but be careful not to use too much water. It only needs to be damp. Do not rub the velour. Light stroking is often enough to restore the original surface again.